Live details

FRIDAY 24th MARCH:  THE BUTTERFLIES OF LOVE + SODASTREAM + FLOWERS + DARREN HAYMAN
Door: 6:30pm

Islington Assembly Hall, Upper Street N1 2UD

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THE BUTTERFLIES OF LOVE
The Butterflies Of Love return to our shores after a gap of ten years to headline the Friday night of Fortuna POP!’s long goodbye. Hailing from New Haven, Connecticut, they made three albums (1999's 'How to Know', 2002's 'The New Patient' and 2007’s “Famous Problems”) of soul-searing melancholy and strange psychedelic rock’n’roll. In their time they had Single of the Week in the NME (back when it meant something) and glowing reviews in Mojo, Uncut, The Times, The Guardian and many more, were compared to the likes of Galaxie 500, Pavement, the Velvets, REM and The Go-Betweens, recorded sessions for John Kennedy at XFM and John Peel at the BBC, and even inspired the latter to applaud live on air. Their shows are wonderful, shimmering, intense affairs and are not to be missed.

"Yearning melodies and softly-softly harmonies (think The Go-Betweens), a back-porch swing (Lambchop, maybe), tentative yet high-tensile guitar work (Velvet Underground, Pavement)...whatever sorry state you may be in at the time, you must haul your arse to one of these shows." (Time Out)

https://www.facebook.com/thebutterfliesoflove

SODASTREAM
From Perth in Australia, Sodastream are Karl Smith (vocals, guitar) and Pete Cohen (double bass, saw and deeply baritone backing vocals). Their debut single was plucked from the slush pile by John Peel and not long after they were awarded Single Of The Week in Melody Maker by Moby. They went on to release four albums on some of the most renowned indie labels around the world including Rough Trade and Fortuna POP!, and earned comparison to the likes of Low, Nick Drake and Will Oldham, jumping effortlessly from acoustic introspection and instrumentals to raucous singalong shanties without any hint of affectation. After disbanding in 2007 they recently reformed, with a new album “Little By Little” set for release in March 2017. Even with the additions of horns, harmonicas, and the drums on their studio albums, the core of their sound remains the same as it is live — Smith’s acoustic guitar, Pete’s driving double bass and some of the best, most beautiful songwriting to come out of Australia in years.

"One of Australia’s best kept secrets, they are up there with the Lucksmiths as one of the country’s finest contemporary exports, and I guess it’s no surprise that there is something of the spirit of The Go-Betweens intrinsic in their sound." (Tangents)

http://www.sodastream.net.au

FLOWERS
There’s something great about a three-piece—think The Cocteau Twins, The Clean, Galaxie 500—and the way that irreducible nucleus takes its strength from its limitations, making a virtue of its purity. And so it is with London trio Flowers, with singer Rachel Kenedy’s ethereal vocals and Sam Ayres textured guitar backed by the powerful, metronomic beat of drummer Jordan Hockley. Flowers have released two albums to date, their Bernard Butler produced debut Do What You Want To Do, It’s What You Should Do in 2013, and second album Everybody’s Dying To Meet You in 2016. Taking their musical inspiration from shoegaze, C86 and New Zealand’s Flying Nun label, they effortlessly blend their thrilling pop songs with noise while leaving space for more stripped back elements, striking a perfect balance between the sweetness of Kenedy’s voice and Ayres’ abrasive guitar stylings.

“A little Jesus And Mary Chain, a lot of Black Tambourine, and one hell of a voice.” – doNYC

DARREN HAYMAN
Formerly the singer-songwriter of the much-loved Hefner, Darren Hayman is now well over ten albums into an increasingly idiosyncratic career path, where he has taken a singular and erratic route through England’s tired and heartbroken underbelly. Darren is also writing the best tunes of his career - increasingly complex and mature songs. At the core of his solo career is his Essex trilogy of albums, beginning with 2009’s Pram Town and 2010’s Essex Arms, and culminating in 2012’s The Violence, a 20-song account of the 17th century Essex witch trials. From this he developed an album of English Civil War folk songs of the time (2013’s Bugbears) and stayed with the historical theme for last year’s Chants For Socialists, which saw him set William Morris’ words to music, creating an album of kindness and hope that brought Hayman’s most critical acclaim yet. Hayman’s latest work is his enthralling and ambitious new album Thankful Villages. Hayman visited each of the fifty four villages in Britain where every soldier returned alive from World War I and created a piece of music and a short film for every one.

“London's laureate of sexual dysfunction, discomfort, and dog-eared under-achievement... the match of Ray Davies, or any of the quintessentially English masters.” (The Guardian)

http://www.hefnet.com

+ DJ Declan Allen